Market deployment potential integrated biorefineries

Biorefinery approach
Assessing market deployment aspects integrated biorefineries

Technical and non-technical market deployment barriers

In spite of the fact that there are already running commercial examples available, large scale implementation of high-efficient integrated biorefinery facilities is still lacking. This is caused by a variety of non-technical (policies/regulations, level-playing-field, full chain stakeholder involvement, ...) and technical barriers. In this activity an assessment will be made of the major critical success factors existing, and on the way these are handled, within the participating countries. By learning from each other, and by consulting experts within the different areas concerned, it will be tried to contribute to the removal of these barriers, shortening the market deployment trajectories.

The U.S. will come-up with a first set-up of the content of the report in 2013. After agreement by all partners on this set-up, the report will be finalised by the U.S. with the help of the other partners. The report will be delivered in June 2014 at the latest.

Coordination: U.S. – Jim Spaeth (jim.spaeth@go.doe.gov)

Disruptive & game changing technologies

At the 14th Task Progress Meeting in Graz (23-25/10/13), it was decided to modify the title of this activity to “The influence of game changing technologies on the market deployment of biorefineries”.

The Dutch team will prepare a set-up of the content of the report in 2013. After agreement by all partners on this set-up, the report will be finalised by the Netherlands with the help of the other partners. The report will be delivered in June 2014 at the latest.

Coordination: NL – Ed de Jong (ed.dejong@avatium.com)

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Central vs. decentral processing

Biomass can be converted at large-scale (central processing), and at smaller-scales (decentral/regional processing). Relatively high-temperature thermal processes (combustion, gasification) are mostly applied at large-scale because of economy-of-scale aspects. On the other hand, low-temperature (bio)chemical processes (fermentation, digestion, ...) can be applied also economically favourable at smaller scales, reducing necessary initial investment costs, and potentially making use of the economy-of-duplication.

This together with other regional advantages, such as: biomass availability, minimise logistics, the possibility to recirculate minerals to the biomass cultivation area, full chain stakeholders that know and trust each other, ..., potentially makes the market implementation at regional-scale more easy. A technical, economic and ecological (TEE) assessment will be made of maximally 5 country specific decentral biorefinery-based value chains, clearly showing the advantages of decentral biorefining. Also an international workshop will be organised discussing best-practises and policy recommendations concerning decentral biorefining processes.

This activity will start in Q1 2014 and will be finalised by the end of 2014.

Coordination: to be decided

Biorefinery-Complexity-Index (BCI)

Based on the classification system of biorefineries and the “Nelson´s complexity index” for oil  refineries a Biorefinery Complexity Index (BCI) is developed. For each of the four features of a biorefinery the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) is assessed using level description between 1 (“basic research”) to 9 (“system proven and ready for full commercial deployment”). Based on the TRL the Feature Complexity (FC) for each single feature of a biorefinery is calculated. With the number of features and the FC of each single feature the Feature Complexity Index (FCI) for each of the four features (platforms, feedstocks, products and processes) is calculated. The BCI is the sum of the four FCIs. The Biorefinery Complexity Profile (BCP) is a compact format to present the complexity of a biorefinery by giving the BCI and the four FCIs of each feature.

Coordination: AT – Gerfried Jungmeier (gerfried.jungmeier@joanneum.at)